20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED IN THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD

Today’s post is quick, but very cool, at least to me. 😊 Below is a link to an article which highlights 20 actual pioneer recipes, which were used during their journey to begin a new life. You have everything from “mud apples” and “chuckwagon beans”, to “vinegar lemonade” and “dutch oven trout”. I hope you enjoy this little journey back in time.


Pioneer life was not easy and the daily chores of managing a house where more than a full time occupation.

Cooking was a major part of each day. Early settlers butchered their own meat and made corned beef, sausage, smoked and dried meats. Large gardens yielded produce for canning, pickling and other preserves. Root cellars stored potatoes, carrots, and onions. Milk was separated into cream for butter and baking and milk for drinking. Breads, cakes and pies were of course all baked at home from scratch from whatever was available…

For the full article and to see the 20 recipes,

follow this link!

My Pioneer Cookbook Adventure: A Look Back ~ 54 Recipes from 1836 through the early 1900’s.

Before I really delve back into pioneer cooking, I decided to take a look back at what I’ve done so far. Today, I take a look back at some of the pioneer cookbook adventure articles I’ve written over that past couple of years. It is my ardent hope to, one day, make this a weekly feature. However, I fear that time is several months away. Here are links to 54 different pioneer and vintage recipes.

20 Old Fashioned Cake Recipes from

the Turn of the Century (1900’s)


15 Incredible Recipes from The Virginia Housewife Circa 1839

1903 Good Housekeeping Cookbook

Snowballs and a Failure

1903 Good Housekeeping

Boston Brown Bread

1903 Good Housekeeping

Rice Waffles

1903 Good Housekeeping

Spoon Bread

15 Recipes that Survived the Oregon Trail

Traditional English Plum Pudding

Until next time, namaste my friends!

Tamara

My Pioneer Cookbook Adventure: Traditional English Plum Pudding from 1903

This article is by far my favorite to write. I love old timey recipes and attempting to prepare them. But, alas, I haven’t had time to devote to this favorite past time of mine.

I wanted to share a recipe with you anyway. This recipe is on my list of things to try from the cookbook pictured below. Over the past year, I’ve been trying different recipes from this book, with different degrees of success.

The recipes are difficult to decipher at times. Words and measurements are sometimes different. There are no cooking temperatures. For me, however, that is part of the fun. I love cooking. So, attempting recipes from the days of my great grandmother is awesome. For me, it doesn’t get any better.

The following recipe is traditional to England, and, never really caught on here in the states. Perhaps it’s the dried fruit, or the fact that it’s boiled, for 5 hours, rather than baked for an hour. I really don’t know. It does intrigue me, however. And, if I do attempt this over the holidays, I will certainly let you all know how it went.

English Plum Pudding

For this recipe, you’ll need a pudding mold, such as the one below:

English Plum Pudding

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

This traditional British pudding is from the 1903 version of the Good Housekeeping Everyday Cookbook


Credit: Good Housekeeping Everyday Cookbook 1903

Ingredients

  • 6 ounces fine bread crumbs
  • 2 ounces each: lemon, orange and citron peel cut into fine shreds
  • 1/2 ounce mixed spices (cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg
  • 1/4 pound chopped apple
  • 1/2 tsp minced lemon rind
  • 1/2 pound sugar
  • 3/4 pound chopped raisins
  • 3/4 pound currants
  • 1 pound flour
  • 1 pound finely shredded fat (suet, lard, butter, etc)
  • 6 eggs
  • milk as needed

Directions

  1. Mix first 10 ingredients thoroughly in bowl.
  2. Then add eggs and milk, if needed, to make a stiff batter
  3. Pour into pudding mold.
  4. Boil for 5-6 hours

Until next time, namaste my friends!

Tamara