Kooky Grape Kefir~ My recipe for Concord Grape Water Kefir

A Concord Grape Kefir recipe.

Hello, my name is Tamara Hoerner and I am a sodaholic. That’s why, about 18 months ago, in an effort to break my addiction, I decided to try making my own gut friendly soda, otherwise known as water kefir. I quickly discovered that this was the exact thing I needed get away from soda and get my body, and gut, back on track. It’s bubbly, like soda and best of all it cut my sugar cravings! It’s also a wonderful way to get reluctant family members to consume probiotics!

I stopped making water kefir at the beginning of 2020. We were preparing to sell our home and move across the country, from Virginia to Colorado. Now that I’m settled, I decided it was absolutely time to make some kefir again. I missed it. I mean what better way to get healthy probiotics into your gut than with homemade soda?

Kefir starter or kefir grains?

Back when I first started making kefir, I discovered 2 ways of making it. The first way is with active kefir grains, which can be purchased from Cultures for Health. These grains are a living microbiome that are mixed with prepared water to make it into kefir. The main benefit is the number of microbes. There can be as many as 30 or more different strains of microbes. These grains are similar to a sourdough starter, in that, you can make an infinite number of kefir batches with them, as long as you keep them alive, by feeding it sugar water on a regular basis. These grains grow and can be “gifted” to others, just like a sourdough starter. The fact that this microbiome must be maintained is also a negative, as many people don’t want to bother with it.

Another downside… water kefir grains only make water kefir. In order to make dairy kefir, you need an entirely different set of grains. This also means, if you want dairy kefir, you now have 2 microbiomes to maintain. Things can get really complicated if you also have a sourdough starter! It’s almost like having pets in the house! With that said, if you plan on making a lot of kefir, it might be worth the time and effort, as this microbiome is diverse and like a whole food.

The second way is with a kefir starter culture. This is a powder sold in packets that can be purchased from Body ecology. Once you’ve made one batch, you can make up to 6 more batches on a single packet, by adding kefir from a previous batch to the new batch. This type of kefir culture can contain from 7 to 9 different strains of microbes. The starter is also a wonderful way for beginners to get their feet wet with kefir. It’s super easy to use and there’s no grains to maintain. You can also use this same starter culture to make dairy kefir. I find this to be a huge bonus. While this starter definitely has its perks, the microbiome is more processed and less diverse than the grains.

Combining 2 methods into one kooky recipe

My investigations into the 2 types of kefir starter also included 2 different methods of making this healthy beverage. The first one I stumbled upon was when I took some classes with the Traditional Cooking School by Gnowfglins. (TCS) This recipe is a 2 stage process using clean filtered water, sugar, kefir grains and an egg shell (for added minerals. The bugs love minerals). The first stage ferments the kefir for 3-5 days. During the second stage, juice is added for “flavor” and to further ferment the kefir, along with aiding in the creation of carbonation. The second one, from Body Ecology, using the powdered kefir starter, is a simple one step process that uses pure, fresh coconut water and the kefir starter to make Coconut Water Kefir.

For my recipe, I decided to combine these two methods. I call it Kooky Kefir because it was kind of an accidental kefir that actually turned out phenomenal. I used 1/2 clean filtered water and 1/2 coconut water. I opted for the kefir starter over the grains. This was mainly because I had the starter on hand, and didn’t want to wait for the grains to arrive in the mail, plus go through the activation process. I normally like to use sucanat for the sugar, but again, didn’t have any on hand. So, I decided to use regular organic cane sugar. I also added the egg shell. I mean, why not? During the second phase, I added organic concord grape juice from Kedem.

The “accidental” part came when I realized I had the wrong kind of coconut water. (thus the name Kooky Kefir) You see, coconut water kefir normally requires pure, fresh unpasteurized (raw) coconut water. Pasteurized coconut water won’t ferment properly (I’ve also used Harmless Harvest coconut water, which is unpasteurized.) Instead, I purchased Naked coconut water. I thought it was raw, but it turned out to be “lightly pasteurized.” Since I was using only 1/2 coconut water, and I was adding sugar, per the TCS recipe, I theorized it would still work, and it did. See for yourself in the video below!

So there’s my story into my Kooky Grape Kefir creation. Here’s the recipe and step by step instructions. Let me know if you try it or if you have any questions.

Concord Grape Kefir

  • Servings: Makes 5 1/2 quarts (45 - 4 ounce servings)
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

A bubbly fermented beverage, reminiscent of grape soda, but healthy! This bubbly beverage is packed with probiotics!


Credit: Tamara Hoerner

Ingredients

  • 1/2 gallon clean, filtered water
  • 1/2 gallon coconut water (see recipe notes)
  • 3/4 cup sugar (preferably sucanat, but use what you have on hand)
  • 2 packets kefir starter culture (Body Ecology) OR active kefir grains (Cultures for Health) OR 1 cup from a previous batch of kefir
  • 1/2 of a clean egg shell (adds minerals to the water)
  • 48 ounces Organic Concord Grape Juice (I used Kedem Organic Grape Juice)
  • A 1 gallon glass jar
  • An instant read thermometer is helpful, but optional
  • 6 swing top glass bottles with rubber stoppers (optional-but these help create the fizz in the kefir. See recipe notes for more info)

Directions

  1. Put the sugar in the gallon jar and cover with about 1 cup boiling water. Stir until sugar is dissolved
  2. Add remaining water and coconut water to the jar and stir.
  3. Check the temperature of the water. It should be above 75 degrees but not hotter than 92 degrees. If you don’t have a thermometer, test the water with your finger. It should feel warm, but not too hot.
  4. Add the kefir culture, whichever one you’re using. I recommend using a starter culture if you’re new to kefir making. If you’re a kefir making expert, use your active kefir grains or some kefir from a previous batch. Stir well, but gently, so as not too overly disturb your little bug friends.
  5. Drop in your egg shell, allowing it to fall to the bottom.
  6. Taste the liquid. This is so you’ll know how sweet it started out, which helps you determine when it’s done, later on.
  7. Cover with a cotton cloth held to the jar with a rubber band. set aside. Leave it alone for at least 3 days, then start tasting it. When most of the sweetness is gone, it’s done. My batch took about 5 days. The kefir can actually be consumed at this point. You can move it to swing top bottles and refrigerate OR move to phase 2!
  8. It’s time for PHASE 2. Put 1 cup (8 oz) of juice into each of the 6 swing top bottles, then fill to the shoulder of the bottle with your kefir. Seal the bottle and let set on the counter for 1-2 days. (If your using kefir grains, don’t forget to rescue them from the jar first!)
  9. After 24 hours, check for carbonation. You should be able to see bubbles forming on the top. You can also check by opening the seal of the bottle. CAREFULLY! If it’s to your liking, and some of the sweetness from the juice has diminished, it’s done. If you let it sit longer than 2 days, burp the bottles every 24 hours. TRUST ME ON THIS! I once had a bottle explode…rookie mistake that will never happen again.
  10. RECIPE NOTES:

    ~ This recipe can be made with all water or all coconut water or a combination like mine. If you use 100% coconut water, make sure you use fresh coconut water, or it won’t ferment. If you’d like to buy bottled coconut water, you MUST use an unpasteurized brand such as Harmless Harvest. Most other brands are pasteurized and won’t ferment.

    ~ If you don’t have swing top bottles, you can use 6 quart jars instead. The kefir won’t be as fizzy, but will still taste good.

    ~ I recommend storing the finished product in the fridge. The cold air tames the activity of the microbes. It will still be fizzy, but you don’t have to worry about bottles exploding.

    ~ After 2 days with juice added, the initial flavor will still be a bit sweet. Over time, the sweetness will dissipate as the microbes eat the sugar from the juice. The longer it sits, the less sweet it will be.

    ~ If 8 ounces of juice in each swing top bottle is too much, adjust the amount of juice to your liking. Just remember, the microbes will eventually eat all the sugar in the bottles, if left long enough. This is what creates the carbonation in the kefir. Your’e not going for the sweetness here as much as the flavor.


Closing thoughts

There are pros and cons to each type of kefir culture. For beginners, my recommendation is to use the kefir starter powder from Body Ecology. This will give you an idea on the process and help you decide if you even like kefir. Then, once you get the hang of it, you can get some grains and start your own microbiome at home.

Until next time… Bon Appetit! Namaste my friends!

The Wellness Mindset ~ Recipes: Creamy Cilantro Avocado Dressing

Today, on my main blog, I discussed the benefits of 1 daily avocado in relation to dementia prevention. So, I thought it only right to include at least one avocado recipe here.

I love avocado, but my better half does not. I’d like to try and incorporate this healthy fruit into our daily diet, but I’ll have to get creative. Why do I want to incorporate it? There are many proven health benefits. Each day this week, I’ll list 2 different health benefits AND, post a video, showcasing a different way to use this amazing plant.

Health Benefits of avocados (1)

  • AIDS IN WEIGHT LOSS
    • Keeps you full longer
    • Eat fewer calories
  • MORE POTASSIUM THAN BANANAS
    • most people don’t get nearly enough potassium and many may be deficient. Avocados are high in potassium, which helps maintain healthy blood pressure.

Source:

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/12-proven-benefits-of-avocado

Until next time, Namaste my friends.

Tamara

10 Delicious & Healthy Chocolate Desserts to Share with the Ones you Love

Middle-Age Wisdom Recipes…I decided to search the internet for delicious chocolate recipes, but that are still on the healthy side. Many of these are vegan and/or gluten free. I hope you enjoy!

I first posted this article on February 13, 2020 in honor of Valentines day. I decided to repost it as today’s recipe article, due to my wellness tip of the day for my MAIN BLOG.

So, in honor of this wellness tip, I present these 10 “healthy” chocolate recipes!


Here’s the original article:

Normally, I’d be sharing insomnia recipes with you all today. However, since tomorrow is Valentines day, I decided to search the internet for delicious chocolate recipes, but that are still on the healthy side. Many of these are vegan and/or gluten free. I hope you enjoy!

Salted Dark Chocolate Almond Clusters

(Vegan, Gluten Free, Paleo, Dairy-Free)

Beaming Baker

4 Ingredient Peppermint Chocolate Crunch Bars

(Gluten Free, Vegan, Dairy-Free)

Beaming Baker

Coconut Chai Chocolate Cake

Clean Eating

Chocolate Raspberry Macaroon Tart

Clean Eating

Chocolate Banana Freezer Pie

Clean Eating

Fudgy Gluten-Free Chocolate Cake

Minimalist Baker

Instant Chocolate Almond Ice Cream

(Vegan)

Super Healthy Kids

No-Bake French Silk Pie

(Vegan)

Blissful Basil

Almond Joy Bites

(Vegan)

My Real Food Family

Chef John’s Chocolate Chia Pudding

Food Wishes

(If you are sensitive to high fiber foods, this one is best avoided)

Closing thoughts…

As I always say, eating healthy doesn’t have to be boring. You just need to be a bit creative with the ingredients. I hope you enjoy time with your loved ones tomorrow.

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY EVERYONE!

Happy Valentine's Day Flashing Hearts Gif Pictures, Photos ...

Until next time…namaste my friends

Tamara

Cranberry Butter Rum Apples Baked in Cider

Yum! I’m giving this one a try! 😍

The New Vintage Kitchen

It’s apple harvest time, and our county has some of the best in the world! We enjoy apples fresh from the tree, applesauce, apple muffins, apple cakes and bread. Baked apples are a special treat, and in our home they hold lots of memories of making them together.

Of course, there are so many ways to make baked apples, lots of different fillings and sweeteners. Use whatever nut you like, or omit them. No cranberries? Use raisins, or dried cherries.

The great apple baking test

The kids and I recently baked up a big batch of a dozen different types of apples to see which ones we liked the best, and good old standbys of Fortune, Empire, and Jonathan won hands down. These apples absorbed the flavor of everything else, and yet kept their pronounced apple flavor and shape, both important.

We used just a touch of spice in these…

View original post 626 more words

Rosemary Orange Cornbread

We just love cornbread in my home! It forms the basis for the cornbread stuffing my family enjoys each thanksgiving. So, when I was presented the task of creating a recipe using ingredients from the Paradise Fruit Company, I knew cornbread would somehow be involved.

As I looked through all of the wonderful fruits sent to me by the Paradise Fruit Company, I decided the orange peel would pair best with the corn flavor. However, To enhance the flavor of the candied orange peel, I added fresh orange juice, fresh orange zest and a bit of rosemary, for a nice woodsy flavor. The result is a wonderful, slightly sweet orange flavored cornbread, with a hint of rosemary in the background. SCRUMPTIOUS!

Most of the ingredients I used are shown below. However, after taking the photo, I decided to add another egg, as well as baking powder, 2 ingredients missing from the photo.

To begin with, I preheated the oven to 375 degrees and lined a loaf pan with parchment paper.

Next, mix the wet ingredients together in a small bowl.

Mix remaining ingredients in a medium size bowl, including the candied orange peel. It’s important for the peel to get coated in flour. This will help them stay suspended throughout the bread and prevents them from “sinking” during the baking process. Make sure the rosemary and fresh orange zest are very finely minced.

Add liquid ingredients to flour mixture. Mix until just blended. Do not over mix.

Pour batter into lined loaf pan and bake at 375 degrees for one hour or until toothpick comes out clean. If the bread begins to brown too much, cover with foil the last 15 minutes.

You must use the toothpick test to detect doneness, not the browness of the bread. This bread browns nicely and very quickly. The first time I tried, I mistook the browness as the bread being done. The toothpick came out “mostly clean”, (there were wet crumbs on the toothpick, but not batter) The bread was also quite brown, so I assumed it was done. This was after the usual cornbread baking time of 30-45 minutes. When we cut into the bread, the middle was still quite doughy.

So, the second time around, I covered it with foil at the 45 minute mark and left it in a full hour. I did the “toothpick test” again, and it was completely clean this time.

Rosemary Orange Cornbread

  • Servings: 12
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

This is a wonderful, slightly sweet, orange flavored cornbread, with a hint of rosemary in the background. It would pair wonderfully with poultry or make great muffins!


Credit: Tamara Hoerner

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • juice and zest of 1 orange
  • 2 tbs fresh rosemary or 2 tsp dried (or combination)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 1/4 cup cornmeal
  • 8 ounces Paradise Fruit Candied Orange Peel
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees and line a loaf pan with parchment paper.
  2. Mix butter, eggs, buttermilk, and orange juice in a small bowl and set aside.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine remaining ingredients and blend well.
  4. Add liquid ingredients to flour mixture. Mix until just blended. Do not over mix.
  5. Pour batter into lined loaf pan.
  6. Bake for 1 hour or until toothpick comes out clean. If the bread begins to brown too quickly, cover with foil for the last 15 minutes.

I hope you enjoyed my little adventure into creating recipes with Paradise Fruit. Let me know if you try it. This was so much fun, that I already have 2 other recipes: Herb Ginger Roasted Lamb and Old English Coconut Oatmeal Cookies. Look for those coming out in the near future. Thanks for stopping by my kitchen!

20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED IN THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD

Today’s post is quick, but very cool, at least to me. 😊 Below is a link to an article which highlights 20 actual pioneer recipes, which were used during their journey to begin a new life. You have everything from “mud apples” and “chuckwagon beans”, to “vinegar lemonade” and “dutch oven trout”. I hope you enjoy this little journey back in time.


Pioneer life was not easy and the daily chores of managing a house where more than a full time occupation.

Cooking was a major part of each day. Early settlers butchered their own meat and made corned beef, sausage, smoked and dried meats. Large gardens yielded produce for canning, pickling and other preserves. Root cellars stored potatoes, carrots, and onions. Milk was separated into cream for butter and baking and milk for drinking. Breads, cakes and pies were of course all baked at home from scratch from whatever was available…

For the full article and to see the 20 recipes,

follow this link!

6 Super Healthy Diabetic Friendly Recipes

Earlier today, on my main site, Purple Almond Wellness, I featured an article about managing blood sugar for diabetes. Here is a list of 6 super healthy diabetes friendly recipes to help do just that! Each recipe uses at least one of the foods on THIS LIST of diabetes friendly foods. In some cases, more than one food is in the recipe. ENJOY!

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Sardine and Lemongrass Salad

From: Saveur.com

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Spinach, Beef and Egg Hash

From: Saveur.com

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LIGHT BERRY FROZEN YOGURT

From: Sugar Free Mom

Broccoli with Parmesan and Walnuts

From: Martha Stewart

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Roasted Garlic and Butternut Squash Soup

From: The Hungry Hounds

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Raw Zucchini and Flaxseed Wraps

From: The Full Helping

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5 Recipes from my Mother’s Kitchen

With all of us celebrating Mother’s day yesterday, I’m honoring my Mom today on both of my blogs. FOLLOW THIS LINK to see a poem I wrote her in June, 2005 for her 60th birthday.

My Mom is an absolutely AMAZING cook! I’d like to think my love of cooking came from watching her work magic in the kitchen. Like my Grandmother before her, it seemed that Mom didn’t measure anything or directly follow any recipe. She could take any recipe, change amounts, or remove/change ingredients entirely and come up with a mouth watering dish. I never knew how she could do that. It’s only now, after I’ve cooked for more than 25 years, that I can begin to understand how to transform a recipe into my own creation.

This photo is from June, 2019. We made some precious memories when our parents came for my son’s High School Graduation. Here we have three generations of family cooking together. From left to right: My Mother-in-law, my son Shaun, me, my Mom.

Today, I’ve picked out 5 of my Mom’s recipes to share with all of you. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

Nachos Casserole

  • 1/2 pound ground beef
  • 1/2 pound hot Italian sausage
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 tsp tabasco sauce
  • salt
  • 2- 1 pound cans refried beans
  • 1- 4 ounce can green chiles (rinsed, seeded, deveined, chopped)
  • 6 ounces Monterey Jack Cheese
  • 6 ounces Cheddar Cheese
  • 2 cups mild taco sauce
  • 1/2 cup chopped scallions
  • 3/4 cup sliced pitted ripe olives
  • 2 cups guacamole
  • 1 cup sour cream
  1. In a large skillet, brown beef/sausage and onion.
  2. Drain fat.
  3. Season with salt and tabasco sauce and set aside to cool
  4. Spread beans in a 4 quart casserole dish
  5. Spread meat on top, then chilies.
  6. Sprinkle both cheeses on top.
  7. Drizzle with taco sauce.
  8. Up til this point, recipe may be covered and refrigerated ahead of time, up to 24 hours. Return to room temp prior to cooking
  9. Bake at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes
  10. Remove from oven. Sprinkle with scallions, and olives. Mound the guacamole in center and top with sour cream. Serve with tortilla chips.

Corn Hot Dish

  • 1 – 16 ounce can cream style corn
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 3 ounces cream cheese
  • 1/2 tsp onion salt
  • 1 can whole kernel corn
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheese
  1. Heat all ingredients on stovetop.
  2. Place in casserole dish.
  3. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes, covered
  4. Sprinkle 1/2 cup buttered cracker crumbs over baked casserole
  5. Bake 20 more minutes, uncovered

Corn & Shrimp Chowder

  • 12 ounces bacon
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup finely chopped celery
  • 3 T finely copped green pepper
  • 1 cup finely copped carrots
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 – 13 ounce can whole kernel corn
  • 2 cups half & half
  • 1 pound shrimp, cooked, peeled & deveined
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 cups diced potatoes
  • 1 t salt
  • 1/2 t pepper
  • 1/8 t cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 t paprika
  • 1 – 17 ounce can cream style corn
  1. In Dutch oven, cook bacon, crumble and set aside. Reserve 1/4 cup drippings.
  2. In bacon drippings, saute onion, garlic, celery, green pepper and carrots til tender. Blend in flour, stirring constantly for 2 minutes.
  3. Add broth and bay leaf, stirring occasionally til thickened.
  4. Add potatoes, salt, pepper and paprika. Cook 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender.
  5. Add corn and heat thoroughly.
  6. Stir in half & half and shrimp. Heat thoroughly, but NOT boil.
  7. Remove bay leaf and taste. Re-season if necessary.
  8. Sprinkle each serving with crumbled bacon and parsley.

Sweet and Savory Meatballs

NOTE: This is a favorite in my home. My kids absolutely LOVE this one. Since I no longer use processed condensed soup, stay tuned for a healthy “remake” in a future article!
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1/4 dry bread crumbs
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1 egg, slightly beaten
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 can golden mushroom soup
  • 1/2 cup drained chopped canned tomatoes
  • 2 T. vinegar
  • 2 T. brown sugar
  • 2 t. soy sauce
  • cooked rice
  1. Mix ground beef, bread crumbs, onion, egg and garlic. Shape into small meatballs. Brown meatballs in 1 tablespoon oil.
  2. Mix sauce ingredients together in a bowl and pour over meatballs in a pan.
  3. Cook in pan 20-30 minutes.
  4. Server over hot cooked rice.

Frozen Strawberry Salad

  • 1 – 8 ounce cream cheese – softened
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 large can crushed pineapple, drained
  • 1 – 10 ounce package strawberries, thawed
  • 2 bananas
  • 1 – 9 ounce cool whip (feel free to use an equal amount of homemade whip cream)
  1. Blend cream cheese and sugar until fluffy.
  2. Add remaining ingredients.
  3. Pour into 9×13 inch pan and freeze
  4. Slightly thaw before serving.
  5. Can be kept in freezer up to 1 month.

Healthy Probiotic “Soda”

Do you love soda? Are you addicted to it and can’t get enough? I am absolutely addicted to soda! I crave it. It is definitely my Achilles heal. I tell myself I can have just a little, just like an alcoholic would talk him/herself into a “small drink”. One small drink won’t hurt, right? Wrong! Sugar and corn syrup are as addictive as cocaine and heroin, maybe more so. We all know, in order to give up alcohol or drugs, there is no in between. The same goes for soda/sugar. I’ve given up soda dozens of time, for weeks, only to talk myself into “just a small glass. This turns into two, then three. Before you know it, I can’t make it through my day without a soda. The rest goes down hill, my diet, along with my weight and my health.



Well, no more! This time is the last time. That’s why this soda recipe is so important for me. It is changing my life. It tastes amazing! I use organic sour cherry juice concentrate. Tart cherries are amazing. They are known to tame inflammation. Tart cherries are scientifically proven to lesson inflammation and boost melatonin in the body. They are also high in melatonin, a super-hormone that plays many important roles in the body, not just for sleep! One thing you need to know is not to drink too much at once. I only drink it twice a day, with my lunch and dinner, as a tasty way to get my probiotics at each meal.

Here are links to two scientific articles researching the benefits of tart cherry juice:

I also use stevia extract (liquid), not pictured


This recipe for a healthy soda will build your microbiome instead of destroying it! The combination of organic juice concentrate, kefir, stevia and mineral water bring you sweetness, flavor and even the bubbles needed to imitate a tasty soda!

10 ‘Depression Era’ Recipes to Make if your Pantry is Bare

One of my favorite things to do is look for vintage and old timey recipes. I decided to scour the internet for depression era recipes for today’s article. I thought it fitting since many items are scarce in grocery stores today. My grocery store is almost always out of flour. Eggs are a hit and miss. Sometimes they have a ton, sometimes none at all.

I always admired people who lived during the great depression. We can, by no means, compare ourselves to what they went through. With shanty towns, food lines and the dust bowl, things were much worse back then. We live in luxury by comparison. With that said, there are certain things that may be hard to get and we can learn a lot from their strength and creativity.

I tried to find recipes that had basic ingredients. Because they were cheaper, hot dogs were often used as the protein. I have included 2 such recipes here. Under normal circumstances, hot dogs wouldn’t be included as an ingredient on this site, but I wanted to include it for authenticity. Feel free to swap out the hot dogs in favor of a healthier meat or sausage. The main point is use what you’ve got on hand and get creative, as they did.

Grandma Pruit’s Vinegar Pie

Taste of Home

This one looks rather interesting. But, is a perfect fit for our theme today. If you have limited resources, this is a great recipe. The author of the recipe says: “This historic pie has been in our family for many generations and is always at all of the family get-togethers.

Old Timey Country Potato Soup

Recipe Lion

This recipe is a wonderful way to fill some bellies and stretch just a few ingredients a long way. As the recipe author says: “Indulge in the comforts of old-fashioned cooking with this classic recipe for Old Timey Country Potato Soup. This easy potato soup recipe will give you something delicious and hearty to serve anytime you’re debating over what to put on the dinner table.”

Poor Man’s Cookies

Taste of Home

These are very interesting and remind me of a similar cake recipe: water cake.
From the author of the recipe: “In the 1930s, producers of a popular radio program called Jake and Lena invited listeners to write in for this recipe. My mother changed the name from Jake and Lena Cookies to Poor Man’s Cookies because they contained no eggs, milk or nuts. Despite the name, the cookies are rich in taste!

Old-Fashioned Hot-Water Cornbread

The Spruce Eats

If your grocery store is anything like mine, regular flour is a scarcity. If this is the case, and you have corn meal in your pantry, give this recipe a try. With only four ingredients, it couldn’t be easier!

Granny’s Cocoa Cream Pie

Forgotten Way Farms

This recipe looks soooo good, and soooo easy! The recipe comes from the author’s own grandmother! I would venture to guess that most pantries will have the ingredients.

Shoo Fly Pie

Grandma’s Vintage Recipes

According to Wikipedia: Shoo Fly Pie is is a molasses pie or cake that developed its traditional form among the Pennsylvania Dutch in the 1880s, who ate it with strong black coffee for breakfast.
source

War Cake

First We Feast

This recipe goes back to rationing during World War II. While technically not “depression era”, it does fit in with the “limited pantry” theme as well as the “no flour” thing! WHY? It has no flour!
source
source

Vintage Brown Buttered

Homemade Noodles Recipe

Happy Money Saver

If With only 4 ingredients, this recipe is awesome. That said, it has 2 of the scarcest ingredients at the moment: eggs and flour.
This homemade noodles recipe comes from a 1900's recipe box. If you want to make noodles from scratch, the old fashioned way, this is a great recipe to try.
This homemade noodles recipe comes from a 1900's recipe box. If you want to make noodles from scratch, the old fashioned way, this is a great recipe to try.

Poor Man’s Meal

Clara’s Kitchen

At the time this lovely video was made, in 2009, Clara was 91 years old. In this video below, she shares a staple of life in the depression: poor man’s meal. I highly recommend watching the video. Clara shares some of her history as she makes the meal.

Hoover Stew

Just a Pinch

According to Mental Floss, this recipe is a generic name for recipes made from soup kitchens soups or thin broth. One recipe calls for spaghetti and hotdogs, such as the one shared by Just a Pinch.
This Recipe And Picture Is By A Woman Named Mrs. Dunn And I Found It On The Web Site-depression Era Recipes.

Until next time, namaste my friends